Category Archives: Public Health

Health inequities in India

Released in 2018, this book edited by Gaitonde & Ravindran includes chapters synthesising current evidence on various axes of health inequities (Springer link)
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Vulnerability: An article for CMJI

From an article for a special issue of Christian Medical Journal of India on vulnerability published in December 2018 [Download issue here]

The word Vulnerability, like many other words in modern English, comes from late Latin vulnerābilis (wounding) or vulnus (wound), according to Webster’s dictionary. In its current use, the word carries a wider meaning beyond impending physical injury or harm, to include the risk of emotional or psychological trauma. It has been widely used in the context of natural disasters. Sudden and often unforeseen natural calamities put a lot of people at physical, socio-economic, political, psychological and emotional harm. However, vulnerability is not only about large populations and natural disasters; individuals or households too can experience vulnerability due to various psychosocial, familial or other life circumstances. In either case – be it individuals or populations – an experience of vulnerability is almost never exclusively due to the individual’s own choices. A large body of work from social sciences, as well as stories and narratives of people who have dealt with vulnerabilities in their life, demonstrates that this experience is almost never caused in isolation.  Continue reading

LUKOSIN: A classic “magical” remedy

I got drawn to the magical remedies of AIMIL Pharmaceuticals early last year and had tweeted about some of their products, two of them BGR34 and Lukosin caught my attention, not only because of the flaunting of DRDO’s logo on the website of this private pharmaceutical company (for Lukosin and a modest mention of the know how by CSIR on the former), but also because of the claims made about cure (not treatment) of Vitiligo.  Continue reading

Sciencing up participation, and participationing science

That health, education and various other public services are distributed unfairly is not new for human societies; the level of unfairness however appears to be on the increase. This is indeed counter-intuitive, given the last few decades’ strides in economic progress and even improved average lifespan and improving access to health globally. Despite widespread feeling that inequalities in health or healthcare distribution is explained by chance or by other proximate explanations such as distance or wealth, the “causes of the causes” are invariably lying within social factors (see my recent TedX talk on health as a matter of chance, or of choice). Continue reading

Niti Aayog Report Healthy states, progressive India: A rapid Karnataka-centred assessment

The Healthy states, progressive India report (HSPI report) seeks to assess various Indian states in terms of their performance in health over time. I have noted below a few quick points from a Karnataka-centred perspective. The note is written mainly for the purposes of generating discussion and debate on strengthening Karnataka’s health. This assessment is by no means a comprehensive summary of the report. The full report is available on the Niti Aayog website here: http://niti.gov.in/content/healthy-states-progressive-india-report-ranks-states-and-union-territories# Continue reading